Organic Wedding Food Myths and Facts

By July 6, 2017Advice

Every time you step into a grocery store you face the big decision to go organic or not. Organic produce tends to have a higher price label, but does that mean it’s better for you to eat? Or worth the price? The debate about eating organic foods continues, so we’ve put together some facts to debunk these myths.

Here are some myths and facts about organic food. Hopefully this information will help you decide which route is best for you to serve on your wedding day.

Organic food is pesticide free

Basket of fresh and colorful vegetables

Organic food comes from a farming system, which avoids the use of human-made fertilizers and pesticides, growth regulators, and livestock feed additives. Yet, not all-organic food is completely free from these elements. Some natural pesticides can be as harmful as non-organic ones. It is difficult to determine which chemicals are safe.

It’s also costly for most small farmers to have that “organic” sticker approved for most food. Check-in on their growing methods. A lack of a label doesn’t mean the farmers are not using pesticide-free growing methods.

Organic food tastes better/ worse

sunrise over a green field

This myth is a personal and subjective claim. There have been some studies done testing the taste of conventional and organic food. The bottom-line is any food that has been sitting or traveling for extended periods of time won’t taste as good. The closer your food source is to you, the better it will taste—organic or not.

Even if you can’t taste the difference, produce grown with pesticides use poison to deter animals, insects, and weeds. Pesticides kill. By choosing conventional food you are risking consuming some amount of toxins—even if there is not a taste or nutritional difference,

It’s too expensive

farmers market stand with vegetable prices
There’s no getting around it—organic food can be more costly. Often, you can find organic products for the same or even less than the cost of conventional food. While the price tag may be higher when you go natural, it will save you in the long run. Standard food could cause health and environmental issues because of the pesticides and chemicals used.

 

Buying organic supports your community and small farmers

Hand giving an apple to another hand

Most of these myths about organic foods stem from confusion with locally grown products. Local produce directly supports the community and those committed to growing fresh fruits and vegetables.

Large portions of organic foods in a grocery store source their products from conglomerate corporations such as Kraft and General Mills. The companies represent themselves as Back to Nature or Cascadian Farms so that the consumer believes they are buying from a small farm.

Organic food is eco-friendly

Rusted truck in grass

Likewise, it is often the belief that buying organic food reduces your carbon footprint and is better for the environment. While this is the case for local food, buying organically doesn’t guarantee a close location.

Your organic food could ship from across the country or even the world. This travel means that trucks and boats are sucking up fuel for your organic wedding entrée. Additionally, all the travel can expose the food to different chemicals and conditions that you aren’t able to track. Your food should be traceable to the source, not a mystery.

Conclusion

Woman eating a vegetable dish with a fork

Eating healthy is important, and this is no exception on your wedding day. To get the best food for you and your guests, go local. By buying from homegrown businesses, you can see where your food is coming from and how it’s getting onto the table. The price tag for this product may or may not be higher depending on your situation.

Even if it is a little more costly, then you can reason it’s supporting a local family, using fewer fossil fuels to travel, and will leave a fresh taste in your mouth. There are plenty of venues that host farm to table weddings, which only use food grown locally. If you are seeking an alternative to standard conventional or organic foods, then look for local vendors and discuss your options with them.